President Trump

I had a lot of trouble writing those two words, just like I have a lot of trouble when I read those words in the paper or on-line–and even more trouble when I hear somebody actually say the words out loud. It still doesn’t seem real to me. But I guess I better sober up and get used to it. Continue reading

I had a lot of trouble writing those two words, just like I have a lot of trouble when I read those words in the paper or on-line–and even more trouble when I hear somebody actually say the words out loud. It still doesn’t seem real to me. But I guess I better sober up and get used to it.
In fact, the best way to work on getting rid of the man (and there are plenty of good, solid, constitutional reasons for doing so) is to take him and his evil little gang very, very seriously.

Now I’m not saying don’t make fun of him; ridicule is–and has been throughout history–a very powerful political tool. So bring on the satires, the lampoons and the cartoons.
Kidding aside, it’s clear from from his speech the other night that we are truly in danger. The man has no understanding of democracy. He obviously sees himself a sort of king–one who has complete, personal power over all the workings of the government. The concept of three, equal branches of government is meaningless to him.

There is, for better–but I think for worse, a history behind Trump’s conception of executive power (not that he has any knowledge of it). Ever since Roosevelt rescued the country from The Depression and led us through World War Two, the powers of the executive branch have been growing. From Truman, straight on up through Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson et. al., Presidents have assumed more and more power, or at least have exercised their constitutional prerogatives more often.
But Trump’s initial orders and memoranda–which he seems to think is the sole way the government functions–have, predictably, been very alarming; Dirty water, coal companies free to pollute, initial steps to roll back Dodd-Frank, building a wall between the US and Mexico, his war on immigrants, etc. etc.

We have to resist and oppose this man and his crew every way we can. And I think one way we can do it is to encourage Congress to shape up and retake the powers that have been stripped from them over the decades. It’s clear there are many Republicans who are anything from uncomfortable to downright angry about the way Trump is acting. That’s a hopeful sign–providing they follow through on how they feel.
It will be interesting to see what happens in the mid-term elections. Could be by then a lot of Americans (particularly a lot of Trump’s supporters) will have awakened from their superficial celebrity trance and notice that they are living in a dirtier, more corrupt, more unhealthy country.
At least I hope so.

Long live the glorious first amendment–now we need free speech and a strong, free press more than ever…

 

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One Response to President Trump

  1. Amy Shapiro says:

    Another very “hopeful sign” is ReVote2017.org — please spread the word at this crucial time, while the Supreme Court, in conference, decides if the merits of this case merits. See also #ReVote2017 and @ReVote2017
    Thank you!

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